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**Gun Enthusiast Thread**

Stija

Go Kart Newbie
Location
Az
Ride
BMW Saab Subaru VW
@Corprin no you cant swap a barrel on most AKs without a press. But like @anotero said once its fine tuned it doesnt get touched again.

As far as cleaning, i had to clean my Colt AR15 every 3 outings or itd have failures at the range. That coupled w cost of shooting .223 and it being the only in that caliber, it had to go. Sold on gunbroker within 20min, funds earmarked for the latest m92 pistol.

And yes, i dont clean my guns or airguns until functionality or precision suffers, but as said ar15 forced my to clean it every 3rd outing. Maybe it was the cheap russian ammo i was shooting, dunno. But now my arsenal has been limited to 22lr, 9, 40 and 7.62x39. I reload my pistol rounds, but rimfire and 7.62.
 

Corprin

Go Kart Champion
Location
Twin Cities
You talk like you engage adversaries knocking on your door three times a day :) Remind me not to get a house where you live -- I don't have time to engage in firefights on a regular basis.

"simple hand tools, etc." -- ehm, why exactly do you buy guns? Not getting snippy, but I prefer to get a gun, fine tune it once or twice and not have to finagle with it by changing anything. You know, I don't want to be caught screwing with my guns via a multitool in case I have to engage a target :)
Let’s say you were a professional chef for years. And for those years you used your 10” chef’s knife to perfectly chop an onion into perfect cubes. You could do this task insanely fast, and above all, your movements were so practiced they had become instinctual. Then, one day, you become a software engineer and have no need to perfectly chop an onion if you don’t want to. Years later you decide to cook dinner that requires copped onion. You place the onion on the board and grab your trusty 10” chef’s knife from the block. Now, it’s not the same exact knife you used as a chef, but it’s analogous in size, weight, ergonomics, much of its functionality, but most importantly, to you it feels the exactly the same. Would you expect to make each slice and cut of that onion, slowly, methodically, as a typical software engineer would? Certainly not, you would fall back on those years of muscle memory, instinct, and experience, and chop the onion like you knew what you were doing. While the results wouldn’t be perfect cubes as so many onions before, it would be done beyond the expected proficiency of any software engineer.

At times in a previous life I trained to engage adversaries, day in day out. I also trained others to do the same. And, for a proportionally shorter while, I used that training to engage adversaries, sometimes, yes, it was multiple times a day in various scenarios. Through years of training, practice, and some practical application of skill sets, those movements became instinctual. Now when I pick up a metaphorical 10” chef’s knife, I can chop the fuck out of an onion without thinking, trying, or putting forth any mental effort. The difference now? I have a chopped onion that cost me $16 in ammo.

I like to tinker, and am a pretty big DIY fan, I watch ALL the shows on TV. This extends into my shooting. Because of the volume I shoot, and my desired outcome, it is not uncommon to require repair/replacement of components. For example, my last long-range competition rifle was 200rds into its third barrel when I parted it out. Because it used a barrel nut, I didn’t need much beyond a water jet cut chunk of sheet metal and a go-gauge to change them out. The goofy deer hunting AR I assembled, required a simple hand tool and some plastic jigs to assemble. No press, riveting, lathe, etc, just put it together like IKEA furniture. If I wanted, I could, go from my right capable 600yrd deer rifle to a questionably legit 10” CQB “pistol” in under 15min of not much effort. This appeals to me, and keeps me from tinkering with my rifles that aught not be tinkered with before they require it.

Some people love ARs, some love AKs, I happen to not love either.... I’m just very proficient at chopping onions with one of the two. 😀
 
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Stija

Go Kart Newbie
Location
Az
Ride
BMW Saab Subaru VW
@Corprin.. well 3 of my AKs can be dissassembled pretty easy cuz i built them using screws instead of rivets. This was purposeful on my part, for reasons just described.

But in general a common AK is riveted and cannot be taken apart without tools. Barrels are still pressed into whats called a front trunnion, and that could be exchanged as a whole unit assuming it wasnt riveted to the receiver.

I still think a chef would have no issues chopping an onion with a 12” knife without much complication, same process slightly different tool.

Pics included of ar15 which sold and ak pistol which replaced it.

Also my first air rifle cz634 .177 offhand shot of the season at a paper target 34yds away in my backyard..
 

Attachments

anotero

Drag Racing Champion
Location
SoCal
Let’s say you were a professional chef for years. And for those years you used your 10” chef’s knife to perfectly chop an onion into perfect cubes. You could do this task insanely fast, and above all, your movements were so practiced they had become instinctual. Then, one day, you become a software engineer and have no need to perfectly chop an onion if you don’t want to. Years later you decide to cook dinner that requires copped onion. You place the onion on the board and grab your trusty 10” chef’s knife from the block. Now, it’s not the same exact knife you used as a chef, but it’s analogous in size, weight, ergonomics, much of its functionality, but most importantly, to you it feels the exactly the same. Would you expect to make each slice and cut of that onion, slowly, methodically, as a typical software engineer would? Certainly not, you would fall back on those years of muscle memory, instinct, and experience, and chop the onion like you knew what you were doing. While the results wouldn’t be perfect cubes as so many onions before, it would be done beyond the expected proficiency of any software engineer.

At times in a previous life I trained to engage adversaries, day in day out. I also trained others to do the same. And, for a proportionally shorter while, I used that training to engage adversaries, sometimes, yes, it was multiple times a day in various scenarios. Through years of training, practice, and some practical application of skill sets, those movements became instinctual. Now when I pick up a metaphorical 10” chef’s knife, I can chop the fuck out of an onion without thinking, trying, or putting forth any mental effort. The difference now? I have a chopped onion that cost me $16 in ammo.

I like to tinker, and am a pretty big DIY fan, I watch ALL the shows on TV. This extends into my shooting. Because of the volume I shoot, and my desired outcome, it is not uncommon to require repair/replacement of components. For example, my last long-range competition rifle was 200rds into its third barrel when I parted it out. Because it used a barrel nut, I didn’t need much beyond a water jet cut chunk of sheet metal and a go-gauge to change them out. The goofy deer hunting AR I assembled, required a simple hand tool and some plastic jigs to assemble. No press, riveting, lathe, etc, just put it together like IKEA furniture. If I wanted, I could, go from my right capable 600yrd deer rifle to a questionably legit 10” CQB “pistol” in under 15min of not much effort. This appeals to me, and keeps me from tinkering with my rifles that aught not be tinkered with before they require it.

Some people love ARs, some love AKs, I happen to not love either.... I’m just very proficient at chopping onions with one of the two. 😀
Man, don't screw with my brain by posting long reads on a Sunday morning, I still have a turbo blanket install of me today. :)

I figured that you were a target engager (I know that's not a word) by trade at some point in the past, I was just being facetious.

It all boils down to your preferences, not absolutes. If you like to replace parts, fine tune on a regular basis, and just have fun with guns as if they were assembly kits, then you'll have a very different take on guns than myself that prefers to fine tune at most a handful of times and then just enjoy a fun and reliable gun. That reminds me, I still need to zero out the newly acquired adjustable aperture rear on my Marlin lever action. Talk about fine tuning just once. :)
 

Corprin

Go Kart Champion
Location
Twin Cities
Man, don't screw with my brain by posting long reads on a Sunday morning, I still have a turbo blanket install of me today. :)

I figured that you were a target engager (I know that's not a word) by trade at some point in the past, I was just being facetious.

It all boils down to your preferences, not absolutes. If you like to replace parts, fine tune on a regular basis, and just have fun with guns as if they were assembly kits, then you'll have a very different take on guns than myself that prefers to fine tune at most a handful of times and then just enjoy a fun and reliable gun. That reminds me, I still need to zero out the newly acquired adjustable aperture rear on my Marlin lever action. Talk about fine tuning just once. :)

No worries man, like I said, not knocking any of them. It’s just what I’m comfortable with. After watching a Polish dude do some run/gun drills with his AK, I was forever put in my place. We handed him an M4 and he looked like a monkey smashing a nail with a ratchet.... or like me trying to do some fancy one handed mag swaps on the run with his AK.

For me it’s ergonomics and what I’m used to. I’m sure with as much training on an AK variant I’d feel the opposite. I don’t dislike the AKs, and I sometimes miss my old PSL.

I have a Williams aperture sight on my Marlin 336, love it.
 

dosjockey

Go Kart Newbie
Location
South
But a 12” chef’s knife is still a chef’s knife, same principal, similar ergonomics, same method of function. Going with our anology, if you were to put a similar sized santoku in the chef’s hand, a knife he has less experience with, he’ll chop the onion, just not with the same instinctual efficiency.

I am not discrediting the AK for what it’s designed to be. Under the doctrine of the nation it was build for



No worries man, like I said, not knocking any of them. It’s just what I’m comfortable with. After watching a Polish dude do some run/gun drills with his AK, I was forever put in my place. We handed him an M4 and he looked like a monkey smashing a nail with a ratchet.... or like me trying to do some fancy one handed mag swaps on the run.

For me it’s ergonomics and what I’m used to. I’m sure with as much training on an AK variant I’d feel the opposite. I don’t dislike the AKs, and I sometimes miss my old PSL.
The whole time I had to carry one, I had trouble with the M4. I thought I was just naturally the worst shot.

Then, one day, I ended up on the SAW. I was far better with that, and being fairly short, it was a good match overall. Of course, I had an AR build later, but I had the same issue. Something wasn't quite right.

When I bought the SCAR, the first time I fired the thing I popped three cans at 50 meters with three shots. This was just on private property with a few guys, and I was so damned surprised I thought someone else had fired the rounds at first. Apparently, all those days and days and thousands upon thousands of rounds of struggling to be better with the AR platform translated to good shooting discipline in general.

The problem was, I had trouble getting used to maintenance (and it was also incredibly loud; stupid loud). I'd had the AR pattern drilled into my head so much that, while I can obviously pick up a SCAR and fire it proficiently, it was difficult to actually live with just for idle shooting. I just plain had to think too much, and wasn't really enjoying it as a private citizen.

In the end, turns out my neck pain wasn't just over-exertion. Now I've got three burst discs in there, but at the time it was on it's way to going out. My problem with the AR platform seems to be entirely related to how it shoulders.

Amazing that it took twenty years and a Gucci gun to figure that out.

Regardless, as a result of buying that SCAR, I learned that sometimes muscle memory is quite powerful. It's one thing to pick up an unfamiliar firearm in the bush when required. It's another thing entirely to own it. :)

That was a long series of valuable lessons. I still remember the frustration of having to sit at the range and waste ammunition to meet the same standards as everyone else.
 

Corprin

Go Kart Champion
Location
Twin Cities
The whole time I had to carry one, I had trouble with the M4. I thought I was just naturally the worst shot.

Then, one day, I ended up on the SAW. I was far better with that, and being fairly short, it was a good match overall. Of course, I had an AR build later, but I had the same issue. Something wasn't quite right.

When I bought the SCAR, the first time I fired the thing I popped three cans at 50 meters with three shots. This was just on private property with a few guys, and I was so damned surprised I thought someone else had fired the rounds at first. Apparently, all those days and days and thousands upon thousands of rounds of struggling to be better with the AR platform translated to good shooting discipline in general.

The problem was, I had trouble getting used to maintenance (and it was also incredibly loud; stupid loud). I'd had the AR pattern drilled into my head so much that, while I can obviously pick up a SCAR and fire it proficiently, it was difficult to actually live with just for idle shooting. I just plain had to think too much, and wasn't really enjoying it as a private citizen.

In the end, turns out my neck pain wasn't just over-exertion. Now I've got three burst discs in there, but at the time it was on it's way to going out. My problem with the AR platform seems to be entirely related to how it shoulders.

Amazing that it took twenty years and a Gucci gun to figure that out.

Regardless, as a result of buying that SCAR, I learned that sometimes muscle memory is quite powerful. It's one thing to pick up an unfamiliar firearm in the bush when required. It's another thing entirely to own it. :)

That was a long series of valuable lessons. I still remember the frustration of having to sit at the range and waste ammunition to meet the same standards as everyone else.

Don’t worry we hated it too ;)
 

Stija

Go Kart Newbie
Location
Az
Ride
BMW Saab Subaru VW
I find the AR to be loud too, way louder than AK. AK seems to more of sloppy metal to metal clonking sounds (feels like its slinging them) while the AR has a definite explosion like sounds which makes it very loud.

That coupled with maintenance and having to carry, or being constantly out of 223 i felt it had to go. I dont even shoot at 100yds+ anymore nor am i trained in the use of any weapon anymore than an avg private enthusiast.

Btw i still have to cut into my pelican case foam from christmas, i will post some pics once done. I hope i can fit two guns in the 1750 case. Had ordered two on amazon and one got cancelled probably due pricing error.. which is why i bought it lol.

Also gotta fit and sight in the Holosun green reflex sight on the m92. Not enough time in the day for all the play.
 

anotero

Drag Racing Champion
Location
SoCal
No worries man, like I said, not knocking any of them. It’s just what I’m comfortable with. After watching a Polish dude do some run/gun drills with his AK, I was forever put in my place. We handed him an M4 and he looked like a monkey smashing a nail with a ratchet.... or like me trying to do some fancy one handed mag swaps on the run with his AK.

For me it’s ergonomics and what I’m used to. I’m sure with as much training on an AK variant I’d feel the opposite. I don’t dislike the AKs, and I sometimes miss my old PSL.

I have a Williams aperture sight on my Marlin 336, love it.
Pics of your Marlin or it didn't happen :))

I bought a Williams aperture rear but won't be using the Williams apertures themselves. Will be using the base for a German variable aperture sight.
 
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Corprin

Go Kart Champion
Location
Twin Cities
Pics of your Markin or it didn't happen :))

I bought a Williams aperture rear but won't be using the Williams apertures themselves. Will be using the base for a German variable aperture sight.
It’s at my dad’s place so I guess it didn’t happen?

To make up, here’s some aperture porn.


1BE9BDA6-29F9-416D-BFA6-60F28C6F99C5.jpeg
E47053EC-2F18-4EA0-9BE6-D2F76E583275.jpeg
 

JerseyDrew77

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Virginia & NC
For anything over 300 yards we like to use a .308 rifle, or if we really feel like making a statement then we will use the M107 .50 cal rifle. If you can't hit 300 yards with the M4, sorry but you need to practice more and make some adjustments. A SCAR light is preferred over the heavy for various reasons and for close quarters, the H&K MK23 and one of my favorites, the H&K MP5.
 

Stija

Go Kart Newbie
Location
Az
Ride
BMW Saab Subaru VW
The only engagement I've personally really practiced for is within 25-10ft. And i need to practice more btw. One of my EDC, 9mm.

Rifles are for fun now and end of world/zombie scenarios. i shoot more break barrel air rifle lately then powder rifles due to time and cost involved.
 

Attachments

Corprin

Go Kart Champion
Location
Twin Cities
For anything over 300 yards we like to use a .308 rifle, or if we really feel like making a statement then we will use the M107 .50 cal rifle. If you can't hit 300 yards with the M4, sorry but you need to practice more and make some adjustments. A SCAR light is preferred over the heavy for various reasons and for close quarters, the H&K MK23 and one of my favorites, the H&K MP5.
Our teams had MP5s for a long while, that is a fantastic weapon for CQB. Down range I had my trusty M500 for breaching and the ever puckering event of clearing stairways.

Spent an hour last night getting my seating die set to have the micrometer match real life.

I have a few had guns, but I shoot long range most. 200yrds with .22lr, and 200-1k with centerfire.

A pistol is only there to fight your way back to the rifle you should have never set down. ..that was a rough day. :ROFLMAO:
 
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Stija

Go Kart Newbie
Location
Az
Ride
BMW Saab Subaru VW
Yea i cant carry a m92/mp5 daily unless in a backpack.

What press do you use for reloading @Corprin? Green, red or blue really right? I use a hornady lock n load but i only reload 9mm and 40sw.
 

Corprin

Go Kart Champion
Location
Twin Cities
Yea i cant carry a m92/mp5 daily unless in a backpack.

What press do you use for reloading @Corprin? Green, red or blue really right? I use a hornady lock n load but i only reload 9mm and 40sw.

I have a cheap/free lee classic turret that a buddy gave me for my plinking ammo, 9x19, .38spl, .45acp, .30 carbine, .223 when I’m not lazy and it’s not stupid cheap, etc. lately I bring a 6-pack to that same buddy’s house and crank out ammo on his Dillon wonder machine. The turret press just sits on the tool shelf.

For my precision ammo, .260rem and 6.5x55se, I run a Lee Classic Cast. I used to have a mid 90s RCBS Rockchucker, but my dad repo’ed it. Did a bunch of research and found for a single-stage the Lee was a very good and consistent unit for a nothing price. If you are looking at going with a stout single-stage, it’s hard to beat. Was looking at a rockchucker II, but my reloading shop owner, who ironically doesn’t sell Lee, said the new rockchuxkers are riding their namesake, the lee is a better built press with stronger material.

Ymmv

https://www.amazon.com/LEE-PRECISION-90998-Classic-Press/dp/B000KK93DA/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=lee+classic+cast+press&qid=1579554926&sprefix=lee+classic+cast&sr=8-1
 

JerseyDrew77

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Virginia & NC
Our teams had MP5s for a long while, that is a fantastic weapon for CQB. Down range I had my trusty M500 for breaching and the ever puckering event of clearing stairways.

Spent an hour last night getting my seating die set to have the micrometer match real life.

I have a few had guns, but I shoot long range most. 200yrds with .22lr, and 200-1k with centerfire.

A pistol is only there to fight your way back to the rifle you should have never set down. ..that was a rough day. :ROFLMAO:
Yes sir, the M500 is great for taking out those door hinges and locks. You are right about the pistol but sometimes it's better to use it in certain tight situations. ;)

I see you are located in Minnesota so former SF?
 

Corprin

Go Kart Champion
Location
Twin Cities
Yes sir, the M500 is great for taking out those door hinges and locks. You are right about the pistol but sometimes it's better to use it in certain tight situations. ;)

I see you are located in Minnesota so former SF?
Nope, not nearly that cool. I just never said no to an opportunity for getting away from working the douche-bag side of my MOS. Can’t spell wimp without me :)

Did lots of cool training, with lots of cool units, in lots of cool places. Got used to the toys, and missed them when I was back with my company. It broke my heart when I had to turn in my PAS-13 for a PVS4 still burning hockey-pucks.
 
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JerseyDrew77

Drag Racing Champion
Location
Virginia & NC
Nope, not nearly that cool. I just never said no to an opportunity for getting away from working the douche-bag side of my MOS. Can’t spell wimp without me :)

Did lots of cool training, with lots of cool units, in lots of cool places. Got used to the toys, and missed them when I was back with my company. It broke my heart when I had to turn in my PAS-13 for a PVS4 still burning hockey-pucks.
Hey that's alright. One team, one fight, right?

Damn man, a PVS-4? Those things are huge! Were you a 11B?
 
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