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Think About This...

bentin

Autocross Champion
Location
Austin, TX
Car(s)
18 GTI SE - 3 Pedals
A lawyer would have no trouble getting that tossed. One advantage to having a manual is that I've found valets are increasingly more likely to let me just park my own car and pick it up when I'm done. I've actually considered getting the shift knob for my Mk8 with no gear shift pattern, just to further confuse folks. Or maybe get it like a Parisian giving directions, just all of the gears in random order, even add a few.

4 - 5 - R - 8
2 - 1 - 3 - 6
 

The Fed

Old Guys Rule
Location
Florida
A lawyer would have no trouble getting that tossed. One advantage to having a manual is that I've found valets are increasingly more likely to let me just park my own car and pick it up when I'm done. I've actually considered getting the shift knob for my Mk8 with no gear shift pattern, just to further confuse folks. Or maybe get it like a Parisian giving directions, just all of the gears in random order, even add a few.

4 - 5 - R - 8
2 - 1 - 3 - 6
At the dealer I use, only the two people I know well drive it. If your car is tuned I would be careful. Not for the warranty, but that the added power could cause a lot person to crash.
 

bentin

Autocross Champion
Location
Austin, TX
Car(s)
18 GTI SE - 3 Pedals
At the dealer I use, only the two people I know well drive it. If your car is tuned I would be careful. Not for the warranty, but that the added power could cause a lot person to crash.
Ha, goes both ways. When I was a kid, my dad had a 560SEL that had the most sensitive fuel filters, they'd clog up and kill one bank of the V8 and put the other bank in limp mode. It probably made 50hp at that point. Was a delight to drive a two plus ton sled with the power of a riding mower.
 

odessa.filez

Autocross Newbie
Location
Roswell, GA
Car(s)
2016 GSW 1.8tsi auto
Yeah what's in that doc we sign when we leave our car for sevice?
 

JC_451

Autocross Champion
Location
NJ
Car(s)
2017 GTI Sport
The owners of the Jeep already took the dealership to court to indemnify them(the dealer) for future damages when the case against them(the Jeep owners) is adjudicated.

Whatever the judgment against the owners of the Jeep is, it will have to be paid by the dealership.

Obviously a ridiculous process where they could easily cut out the middle step, but the Dealership or their insurance company is going to end up being the ones who pay out.

Also, this kid lost control because he couldn't operate a manual transmission.
 
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MonkeyMD

Autocross Champion
Owner of the vehicle shouldn't have to do anything. Case against vehicle owner should be thrown out immediately and plaintiff should have to pay any legal fees for even filing a lawsuit against him. This is just stupid. Doesn't matter if dealership will cover any adjudication against owner. There should be no case against owner period.
 

The Fed

Old Guys Rule
Location
Florida
Dealers carry Workshop Insurance for this, but I would still see if your own insurance company needed at least know about it. I think every company has a time limit. Years ago, I was rear-ended while sitting at a traffic light. There was already a car sitting in front of and behind me. I head tires squealing and saw a car coming sideways behind us. Unfortunately, the road was much higher than the ground below, with a very steep decline. I couldn't safely get around the ahole in front of me and was bumped enough to cause $2000 in damage to the bumper and quarter panel. Even broke a suspension part I can't remember the name of. The people in the cars behind us were badly hurt; we only felt aa slight bump, probably because I got us out of the way enough. The police informed me our state holds the last car in the row entirely responsible and gave us their information. It was an older couple who claimed they just had their brakes serviced. I called my insurance company, and they noted my account, telling me if they didn't pay to let them know. They had GEICO, so I expected a fight, but they took care of everything. Took them 2 weeks to appraise the damage though, and I was a crappy rental car for 6 weeks. That hurt the most. Got all of the wife's mulch and plants at one time though, and I didn't need to put down moving blankets to protect the interior. :)
 

vjmvjm

Go Kart Newbie
Owner of the vehicle shouldn't have to do anything. Case against vehicle owner should be thrown out immediately and plaintiff should have to pay any legal fees for even filing a lawsuit against him. This is just stupid. Doesn't matter if dealership will cover any adjudication against owner. There should be no case against owner period.
Sorry, that's nice in theory, but that's not how the law works.
 

MonkeyMD

Autocross Champion
Sorry, that's nice in theory, but that's not how the law works.
Yeah. I guess you can sue for anything. Doesn't make it right or within the realm of common sense.
Frivolous lawsuits are still frivolous lawsuits. A counter suit is well within reason.
This is what i would be doing immediately.
 

bentin

Autocross Champion
Location
Austin, TX
Car(s)
18 GTI SE - 3 Pedals
Did you read the story? Based on state law, including workers comp rules, the lawsuit is the appropriate manner to recover damages. A counter suit against whom?
The dealership would be the start and end of responsibility. Once it's in their hands, the vehicle owner is absolved of all responsibility. The stupid argument that it's like lending a car to a friend is not the case at all. The car was taken to a dealership service department. If you park your car in a service area and walk away from it after handing the keys to a representative of the dealership, then that's where your responsibility ends, the same way that if they damage it from that point until you drive off with it, it's on the dealership. Unless you run over the person taking the keys, everything from that moment forward is now on the dealership and the service staff. It's ridiculous to claim that the vehicle owner is culpable in any manner and a counter suit against that lawyer for frivolous charges would be warranted.

It's unfortunate that the technician lost their life, but it sounds like safety protocols were not followed by that technician and the service person moving the vehicle. If the technician driving the vehicle at the time the event happened wasn't comfortable operating a manual transmission, than that raises a question as to why they attempted to in the first place and a qualified operator wasn't sought. But again, this is all down to the dealership and their practices.

The last time I took my car in for service, the guy who took the keys looked in, saw it was a manual and hung the keys up on the board until someone that could drive it moved it back to the bay. That's not difficult and an increasingly familiar situation at valets, service appointments or any other situation where you let other people drive your car.
 
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vjmvjm

Go Kart Newbie
The dealership would be the start and end of responsibility. Once it's in their hands, the vehicle owner is absolved of all responsibility. The stupid argument that it's like lending a car to a friend is not the case at all. The car was taken to a dealership service department. If you park your car in a service area and walk away from it after handing the keys to a representative of the dealership, then that's where your responsibility ends, the same way that if they damage it from that point until you drive off with it, it's on the dealership. Unless you run over the person taking the keys, everything from that moment forward is now on the dealership and the service staff. It's ridiculous to claim that the vehicle owner is culpable in any manner and a counter suit against that lawyer for frivolous charges would be warranted.

It's unfortunate that the technician lost their life, but it sounds like safety protocols were not followed by that technician and the service person moving the vehicle. If the technician driving the vehicle at the time the event happened wasn't comfortable operating a manual transmission, than that raises a question as to why they attempted to in the first place and a qualified operator wasn't sought. But again, this is all down to the dealership and their practices.

The last time I took my car in for service, the guy who took the keys looked in, saw it was a manual and hung the keys up on the board until someone that could drive it moved it back to the bay. That's not difficult and an increasingly familiar situation at valets, service appointments or any other situation where you let other people drive your car.
That's all nice, but that's not reality. It is not correct that "the owner is absolved of all responsibility". Maybe in some imaginary world. Or can you document this?
 

bentin

Autocross Champion
Location
Austin, TX
Car(s)
18 GTI SE - 3 Pedals
That's all nice, but that's not reality. It is not correct that "the owner is absolved of all responsibility". Maybe in some imaginary world. Or can you document this?
Can you show me one case where your silly fantasy actually played out?
 
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