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DIY PTC (Auxiliary) Heater Install

Cadbury

Ready to race!
Location
Winnipeg
Ride
GTI MKV
TDI’s are notorious for having very poor heat output, especially in colder climates. VW finally did something about this and MKV TDI Jettas have an auxiliary 1000W electric heater installed just after the normal heater core inside the heating system. Gas powered vehicles like the GTI don’t have this heater because they heat up quicker, but as I discovered the place for the heater is still there.

This should with for both Climatronic and Climatic heating systems.

This will only work for Valeo heating systems and may only work on specific years.

The heater:


Stage 1, Inside:

Tools:
T25
6mm socket

Parts:
PTC Heater 1K0 963 235 E (from German eBay)
Cover 1K1 819 349 E (optional)
10 feet 4AWG wire
4x 4 AWG ring connectors
Electrical Tape/zip ties
Connector 1K0 972 704 C
Repair wire 000 979 009
2 6mm nuts from the hardware store

Step 1, Gain access to the heater.

The heater is installed on the right hand side inside the driver’s footwell.
Remove these 2 screws (red), they are both T25:



Remove this screw, it is T25 as well:



To remove the panel you will need to pull back slightly on the overlapping portion shown here:



Step 2, Remove the stock cover.

Here we see a drawing of the heater installed. Remove the 3 screws marked number 1. There is one more bolt not in the picture is located in red:


With the cover removed you can install the heater into the slot behind it, use 2 of the cover bolts to attach the heater.

Here is an image of the installed heater. You may need to trim some plastic around the terminals depending on the size of your ring connectors:


In the above picture the cover has been reattached. The red line is where I trimmed off the plastic where the cover is now. The 3 remaining bolts were used to attach the cover. Here is the piece I trimmed off:


The bolt holes at the top and bottom are in the same position as the 2 holes used to attach the heater itself.



Step 3, Positive and ground connections.

The heater uses around 80 Amps of current, this is a lot of current and if the connections are not made good enough we could cause a fire. There was actually a TSB for the nuts on the heater not being tightened enough from the factory causing a fire I believe.
Cut the 10 feet of wire into 2 pieces, 1 4 feet and the other 6 feet.

Attach 1 connector to the end of the wires, 4 in total. I crimped the connections, soldered them to the wire and added sleeves to the connectors

Here is an example:


Attach the wires to the heater using the 6mm bolts. Make sure you have the negative wire on the (–) terminal and the positive wire to the (+) terminal:


Step 4, Wire the data connection:
The heater has a direct connection to the comfort CAN bus. The nearest location of the bus would be the Data bus diagnostic interface.
The pins are not visible so we are looking for the orange/brown and orange/green that are twisted together. Cut the repair wire in half and attach 1 end to each of the wires and to each of the bus wires.



The module is the black box with the red plug in it, the object in the blue box is the top of the brake pedal. Circled in red is there the wiring connections are made:


The repair wire attached to the orange/green wire goes into pin 1 and orange/brown goes into pin 2.

Plug the wire into the heater (red):



Step 5, Negative wire to the chassis.

Remove the left kick panel to access the ground post. Instructions can be found in the sub install DIY http://forums.vwvortex.com/zerothread?id=3250572. Once the panel is removed attach the other end of the ground wire to the lower post (B). You will need to move the carpet to see the post: [IMG]http://lab.wollmann.ca/GTI/1f.jpg[/IMG] [B]Step 6, Positive wire through the firewall.[/B] This is the rubber gasket where we will feed out wire through the firewall (ignore those 3 wires, they are for my water injection controller). Cut a slit into the gasket large enough to feed the wire through: [IMG]http://lab.wollmann.ca/GTI/14.jpg[/IMG] Feed the wire through: [IMG]http://lab.wollmann.ca/GTI/IMG_3608.jpg[/IMG] [B]Stage 2, Outside.[/B] Tools: 8mm,10mm,13mm socket Parts: 100 Amp fuse N 105 255 06 Nut N 101 181 02 5x16mm bolt and 5mm nut from a hardware store In red is where we will attach the wire we fed through the firewall in stage 1: [IMG]http://lab.wollmann.ca/GTI/10.jpg[/IMG] [B]Step 1, Remove battery and tray:[/B] The removal of the battery is self explanatory. You will need a 10mm wrench/socket to remove the cables from the battery. Always remember to remove the negative side first. The bracket that holds the battery down is 13mm (blue). Once the battery is removed you will need to remove the tray it sits on. There are 3 bolts (red). In the picture below one bolt is not pictured: [IMG]http://lab.wollmann.ca/GTI/21a.jpg[/IMG] Tray removed: [IMG]http://lab.wollmann.ca/GTI/21b.jpg[/IMG] Step 2, Pull wire through firewall: This is the rubber gasket where the wire will come out of. Simply pull on it till you just enough slack on the inside to make the wires neat: [IMG]http://lab.wollmann.ca/GTI/22a.jpg[/IMG] Run the wire here (red): [IMG]http://lab.wollmann.ca/GTI/22b.jpg[/IMG] [B]Step 3, Attach positive wire to the bus bar:[/B] Attach the wire to the fuse. For example: [IMG]http://lab.wollmann.ca/GTI/IMG_3601.jpg[/IMG] Attach the fuse to the bus bar: [IMG]http://lab.wollmann.ca/GTI/IMG_3605.jpg[/IMG] [B]Stage 3, Programming:[/B] Tools: VAG-COM [B]Step 1, CAN gateway:[/B] Here we change the coding of the CAN gateway so the gateway knows that there is an aux heater installed: [IMG]http://lab.wollmann.ca/GTI/canhelper2.jpg[/IMG] [B]Step 2, Central electronics:[/B] Here we change the coding of the central electronics module so the it knows that there is an aux heater installed: [IMG]http://lab.wollmann.ca/GTI/vcenthelper2.jpg[/IMG] [B]Notes:[/B] The heater works very well. It was about -5 outside today and I had warm air in about 30 seconds and hot air in about 1 minute. Some criteria needs to be met before the heater will turn on. For example: The engine must be running and above about 700 RPMs, the alternator load must be below a certain percent, and your heater temperature setting has to be past a certain point. Once your coolant temperature reaches 75C the heater turns off. The heater will adjust its output based on the alternator load. For example: idling with your headlights on will limit the output to about 600W. When you are driving the heater will go to a 1000W output. *Edit: Sept 25/2017, Updated photo links. -Cad
 
Last edited:

Cadbury

Ready to race!
Location
Winnipeg
Ride
GTI MKV
The TDI's come with a 140 amp alternator. I checked the part number on mine and I have a 140A as well. There is a listing for a 110 amp alternator in ETKA.


-Cad
 

maydond

New member
Location
moscow
Thanks, man! I did the exact installation in my Skoda. Could you, please, explain this a bit more:

Some criteria needs to be met before the heater will turn on. For example: <...> and your heater temperature setting has to be past a certain point
 

Cadbury

Ready to race!
Location
Winnipeg
Ride
GTI MKV
A VW Self study guide indicated that the temperature needs to be set at least 80% to the hot side.

I have found that as long as you have the temperature set slightly on the heat side the heater is on.


-Cad
 

wokwon

Bork! Bork! Bork!
Location
Melbourne
Ride
MY07 Jetta
Sorry for resurrecting such an old thread but I'd like to point out:

- If you have a RHD car (ie. UK, Australia) then the install takes place on the passenger side. You have to take out the glovebox (easy) but there is a lot of other crap in the way that you have to move to get access to the slot that the PTC element slides in. The main problem is the plastic support beam that the glovebox mounts to: it blocks the slot.

I did this install on my MY07 MKV Jetta on the weekend and it took me 6 hours and much swearing.
 

LateAPXR

Ready to race!
Location
Fort Wayne, IN
I've found a lot of these TDI Aux heater cores on ebay but none of them with the same part number. I can't tell if these are simply newer versions of the same part or if they're completely incompatible. Does anyone know? Visually the connections look different so I'm guessing at "incompatible" right now, but I'd like to be 100% certain.

The OP stated that 1K0963235E is the part he used.

I keep finding 1K0963235F and 1K0963235G versions on ebay.
 

eurocars

5/17/15 - Never forget
Location
Indianapolis
Ride
2006 GTI
The 1K0963235E comes on the '05 Jetta TDI's. Th 1K0963235F comes on the '08 Rabbits and the 1K0963235G comes on the '12 Golf's. They are three different parts and the first pn the OP listed is the most expensive of any of the three i've seen. Not sure if they are interchangable or not
 

LateAPXR

Ready to race!
Location
Fort Wayne, IN
The 1K0963235E comes on the '05 Jetta TDI's. Th 1K0963235F comes on the '08 Rabbits and the 1K0963235G comes on the '12 Golf's. They are three different parts and the first pn the OP listed is the most expensive of any of the three i've seen. Not sure if they are interchangable or not
For my specific application I need whatever will fit a 2008 FSI. The OP's car was a 2007, but it looks like things may have changed between those years.

Unfortunately I can't find any concrete info on it yet.
 
Bumping because it's goddamned cold out there.

1K0963235E and 1K0963235F are different beasts.

According to these guys:

http://www.briskoda.net/forums/topic/253504-1k0963235f-activation-code-for-cbbb-engine-ecu/

The E revision connects to CANbus, has onboard brains. F version is dumb (just heating element, apply power and it gets hot) and earlier version ECU won't know how to turn it on.

Which may mean that you could still jam it in there somewhere and control it with a switch.
 
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