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Apexi Turbo Timer on ED30 with GT2871

swenak

New member
Location
Prague
Car(s)
MKVI GTI Edition 35
Hi,

I want to install Apexi Turbo Timer on my MKV ED30 with GT2871 turbo. My question is not, if I need it, i know, that I want it. Have someone installed it, or other TT on MKV? How I install it? To which cables I must connect TT?

Thanks.
 

The Fed

Old Guys Rule
Location
Florida
Not sure what you'll accomplish, because we already have automatic water circulation for the turbo's water jacket built in, and an oil cooler. Oil coking had not been a problem on our cars, regardless of the turbo. If you use real synthetic oil, you should never have a turbo bearing problem.
 

swenak

New member
Location
Prague
Car(s)
MKVI GTI Edition 35
Hi,

as I wrote, I want it. Engine have only water pump than is on after engine shut off. In previous GTI I must replace turbo because of crack:( Now, I wait for ECU tuning for about 350-400hp. I have buyed and mounted Apexi TT and only what I need is wiring:(

Thanks.
 

The Fed

Old Guys Rule
Location
Florida
If it has it's own fuse, you can take power from the front of the underhood fuse box. If not, you need to add an appropriately sized fuse. Ground to anywhere convenient.
 

GodSquadMandrake

Radioactive Rotary Rocket
Location
Minneapolis
Swenak you sound like you just came out of 2003, even rocking the Disco Potato turbo. It's still a sweet turbo and I'd want to protect it too, but nobody uses turbo timers anymore. If you really want it, just install a car alarm with remote start. It's the same price, does the same thing, and it'll also start your car and provide security. You need a modern remote start system with CANBUS ability. The most common one is Viper 5901 and there is a thread that me and pan.pep made about installing it.

You might be able to get that Apexi turbo timer to function, but I don't think you can arm the alarm with the car running. You might have to just lock the door with the key. The European models came with a different alarm than the US models, so it might work, or it might just arm the alarm without locking the doors or the other way around.

Anyway you need to find +12v ignition, +12v Accessory, ground, battery and that's it. You need a multi-meter to do that. The connections should be crimped, soldered, plasti dipped and/or shrink wrapped. The crimped connection provides mechanical strength, the solder is for less resistance and the plasti-dip or shrinkwrap tubing protects from corrosion.

I'm uploading a picture to help you out. That solid black wire in the picture is the ignition wire which you will need to connect. You can also see the red/orange wire behind it, and that is I believe the accessory +12v. I'm not certain that is absolutely necessary for a turbo timer because it only controls the radio, HVAC, etc, but sometimes you get odd behavior from the ECU if you use the electronics in ways other than what they were designed to do. You might get an intermittent fault code in vagcom if you didn't hook that wire up.

The big main wire loom at the bottom contains the +12v battery which is going to be a red wire. The big yellow wire is probably another ignition wire, it might be the same. I think you can connect both the blue and the green (IG1 IG2) from the Apexi auto timer to that wire, but of course check what it does first with the multimeter. For the parking brake switch, I would just access it directly at the parking brake if needed. Since you have a DSG, you might not need it. Don't even think of trying to hook up that o2 sensor wiring because it won't work with these wideband o2 sensors. There are Bosch wideband o2 sensors that have a narrowband output wire, but the best of my knowledge, our OE o2 sensors does not have that function and therefore the o2 sensors voltage monitoring function of the Apexi auto timer will not work. There is a way to reprogram the auto timer to accept different o2 sensor values can you could teach it what the correct voltages are, but I still wouldn't recommend tapping into the ECU's o2 sensor wire. The reason for that is because this is a much more sensitive signal than a simple narrowband and when you tap into it with that vampire tap that comes in the Apexi kit, you're going to add a small amount of resistance onto the wire. That means the ECU will always think the engine is running a little richer than it actually is. It's just not a good idea. A better idea would be to weld in a bung in your exhaust and add a third, narrowbank o2 sensors. I'd recommend one from a Ford Mustang because you can get them for like $20 from the auto parts dealer. Of course you could just use it as a timer only and not connect the o2 sensor, but now you have essentially wired and expensive clock/voltage gauge to your car.

Anyway those are all the reasons why you shouldn't do it.
 

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The Fed

Old Guys Rule
Location
Florida
I can't understand why anyone needs one, since we have an after-run water pump. All a turbo timer does is run the car for a specific period of time, it doesn't know what the temperature of the turbo is, where I believe our after-run system doesn't shut off until the water temp drops to certain point. I remember other cars I had, where if you started the car 5 minutes after shutting it off, the temp gauge shot up until the coolant started circulating. And the oil cooler is cooled by the water (coolant), so everything should be about the same temp - no more than about 200 degrees, way below the coking point of even a mineral oil/synthetic blend. If you use "real" synthetic oil, you probably don't even need the after-run pump.
 

GodSquadMandrake

Radioactive Rotary Rocket
Location
Minneapolis
The purpose is to allow the turbo's shaft to cool evenly. Two things can happen if you just turn the car off: 1) The oil can burn and turn into carbon that sticks on the shaft and creates an imbalance. That imbalance, combined with high shaft speeds (100,000 RPM) will eventually cause the bearings to wear out and create shaft play. 2) The shaft can warp if it cools in a stationary position and this can have the same effect as above. Therefore even if the after-run water pump does cool the turbo shaft quickly enough, it may cause the shaft to warp. That's probably not an issue on the stock turbo on stock boost using the VW 501 oil, however the turbo he's using is making twice the horsepower as stock, and that means there is the potential for much higher manifold pressure and heat. This turbo still has an internal wastegate, and a small housing, so all of that heat and pressure has to flow through one area and it can become a challenge when you push the limits. We're not talking about instant failure but it may allow him to get a few extra miles out of the turbo before it fails. So yes it is unnecessary, especially because this turbo is water cooled and has the after-run pump and is probably just a waste of gas.
 

swenak

New member
Location
Prague
Car(s)
MKVI GTI Edition 35
GodSquadMandrake: Thanks! This is, what I need. Maybe TT is not necessary, but in theory, if can help extend the life, why not use it. Price for new turbo, or repair is bigger, than TT.

All: Maybe, I'm idiot, if I want TT, but if I ask "how", why peoples answer "you dont need it"? I read other themes and still without answer on same question, still same "you dont need it".
 
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